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Surrey Mitsubishi Blog


Mitsubishi Electrified!

Are you tired of constantly having to stop at the gas station? You are spending, on average, $450 a month in gas and you don't need to be! The 2018 Outlander PHEV typically costs $2 per charge. If you are charging it once a day that is about $60 per month instead of $450 in fuel!

Worried that you will get caught in the middle of nowhere and not have enough battery to get home? Don't be! The reserve fuel takes makes sure that if you do happen to run out of energy you will never get stranded looking for an energy source! It will seemlessly switch between electric and fuel as required.

Are you concerned there won't be enough power to get you up those big hills in White Rock? Not to worry, the 3 driving modes have you covered! The EV drive mode uses electricity only and gives you a surprisingly powerful drive. When you are going up those huge hills and need a little boost, the series hybrid mode uses engine generatged electricity along with the battery electricity to give you that extra kick. When you really wanna step on the hammer the parallell mode used both electric and gas! So you will never be at a loss for power!

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV will change the way you drive! THE FUTURE IS HERE at Surrey Mitsubishi!

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It’s never been a better time to go shopping for a crossover. Every brand is just falling all over themselves to get their latest little runabout into your driveway, and the competition is pushing more and more features into more affordable models.

Every year, masses of consumers are switching from cars to SUVs, so each brand is aiming to offer more selection in terms of size, style, and value in their SUV lineups, like Nissan with no fewer than five sizes, three of them compact or smaller. Mitsubishi isn’t a major player in the North American scene, but they have quietly built up their portfolio as they turn their focus to crossovers.

The Outlander and RVR have been on the market for some time, but are relatively fresh for Mitsubishi products. The latest arrival for the brand is the 2018 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross, slotting neatly between those two and lining up with the smaller compact crossovers like the Hyundai Tucson, Nissan Qashqai, and Subaru Crosstrek. It’s a pretty fluid segment, so good luck trying to pin down the competitive set these days.

The Eclipse Cross shares the same 2,670 mm wheelbase as the smaller RVR and larger Outlander; and at 4,405 mm long, it is a bit longer than the RVR, and quite a bit shorter than Outlander. Cargo space is just a bit more than RVR at 640 litres in the trunk and 1,385 with the 60/40 split-folding rear seats both dropped – though they don’t fold quite perfectly flat. Plenty of room for a road trip or weekend away, but it might fall short of having enough space for the annual camping trip if four people are along for the ride. The seats themselves are comfortable in both rows, but headroom is limited in the rear – I found my hair brushing against the headliner, and I’m less than six feet tall.

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Although it’s sized closer to the RVR, it’s priced closer to the Outlander, and that is because Mitsubishi thinks this will appeal to an entirely different buyer, one that is more interested in style, technology, and features than outright practicality. And though practicality may take a back seat to style with the Eclipse Cross, Mitsubishi is in no position to offer anything but good value, so while the price climbs a little compared to the RVR, the Eclipse Cross includes some healthy kit for its $29,248 starting price ($27,798 MSRP plus $1,450 destination charge). Chief among those that Canadians will appreciate is standard S-AWC all-wheel drive and a new 1.5-litre turbo four-cylinder.

The Eclipse Cross is the first vehicle to feature Mitsubishi’s new 1.5L turbo, and in addition to variable timing and direct injection, it also has port injection and electronically controlled wastegates to further improve efficiency and eke out every bit of power available. The end result is 152 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque, all of which feels very usable, since peak toque is delivered as early as 2,000 rpm. Ranging in weight from 1,565 kg to 1,590 kg depending on trim, the Eclipse Cross accelerates smartly thanks to that standard all-wheel drive and a responsive continuously variable transmission, which defaults to provide some sportiness, though an efficiency-minded Eco mode is available at the press of a button on the console.

The small turbo engine and fuel-saving tech should pay off over the long run, and Transport Canada rates the Eclipse Cross at 9.6 L/100 km in city driving, 8.9 on the highway, and 9.3 in typical mixed driving. These ratings don’t quite measure up to leaders like the Subaru Crosstrek (8.8/7.2/8.1) or Nissan Qashqai (9.0/7.5/8.3), but they are better than the Hyundai Tucson (11.0/9.1/10.2) and Jeep Compass (10.8/7.8/9.5).

The steering is crossover-light but natural, and the suspension finds the right balance between prioritizing comfort and absorbing rough impacts, and providing enough stability in turns to be the athletic one in the Mitsubishi SUV lineup. What rough patches we saw, which included a bit of washboard-gravel road, were reasonably controlled without too much clattering, and it was even a bit of fun to toss into corners, the brake-based torque vectoring of Mitsubishi’s Super All-Wheel Control (S-AWC) helping to tuck in the front end and get going out of curves. Let’s be real, though, this is no Evo or even a sporty car, but if that’s what you wanted you’d be shopping for a Subaru WRX or Volkswagen GTI, not a compact crossover.

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The Eclipse Cross, in addition to all-wheel drive, packs on quite a few desirable features as standard equipment, like back-up camera, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, and on the top trims has some other pretty high-end gear like LED headlights, adaptive cruise control, and head-up display. Although the head-up display is on its own tacked-on little screen that flips up, Mitsubishi pointed out that windshield-projected head-up displays require a coating that makes those windshields significantly more expensive to replace should you get a bad crack.

Some other notable perks of the base ES trim are heated power side mirrors, 18-inch alloys, Bluetooth connectivity, 7.0-inch touchscreen system, steering-wheel-mounted audio, cruise, and phone controls, and automatic climate control. Another feature you shouldn’t overlook is Mitsubishi’s warranty: ten-year or 160,000 km limited powertrain warranty, five-year or 100,000 km limited new vehicle warranty, plus five-year, unlimited mileage roadside assistance.

The next trim up is the SE, priced at $31,448 (including destination), which adds blind spot warning with lane-change assist, rear cross-traffic alert, paddle shifters, dual-zone auto climate, leather-wrapped steering wheel, rain-sensing wipers and premium seat fabric. That fabric was actually pretty cool, with a high-tech-looking pattern worked into it. If you prefer fabric seats, you don’t get shafted by packaging, and can still get the good tech, as Mitsubishi offers a Tech Package on the SE for another $2,000, lumping in some of the latest driver aids, including forward collision mitigation with pedestrian warning, lane-departure warning, adaptive cruise, plus auto high-beams, and auto-dimming rear-view mirror with HomeLink garage door opener. This is the value leader of the lineup and is nicely featured without the price climbing up too high.

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However, if you are set on all the features and are willing to spend for it, there are two GT trims available that start by including all the features of the Tech Package, then adding double sunroof (Mitsubishi calls it panoramic, but really it is a sunroof that opens in the front, and a second, fixed roof “window” for rear passengers), LED headlights, head-up display, multiple views for the back-up camera, 710-watt Rockford-Fosgate audio system with nine speakers and big subwoofer in the back, plus leather seats, power driver’s seat, and heated steering wheel and rear seats. The GT lands at $37,448 (including destination), so it’s not cheap, and the GT Diamond Edition dresses it up with a body kit, black wheels and fancy red paint for $38,948.

It does make for an attractive package, and the interior has looks to match, but we do have one big gripe with the interior. Although the central seven-inch display is a touchscreen and there are steering wheel controls for typical audio and phone functions, there is also a small trackpad on the centre console with some smartphone-style actions for common functions. It pretty much sucks. There is no haptic feedback and it did not seem intuitive at all, and I’m pretty sure most people would trade it for a pair of good old-fashioned volume and tuning knobs – Senior Editor Jacob Black would be guaranteed to pick a pair of dials 11 times out of 10 instead of this “dog’s breakfast”. It very much feels like Mitsubishi got stuck with tech that sounded cool from a few years ago, and couldn’t develop an alternative in time for this launch. Although Mitsubishi’s research shows that the Eclipse Cross will appeal to the younger generations, there are still plenty of Boomers and others that don’t want to be challenged with an unpleasant user experience just to change the volume or station.

However, that is probably my biggest beef with the Eclipse Cross, and I would consider it a minor one. The Eclipse Cross has up-to-date, modern mechanical underpinnings, it drives well and suits the segment, its styling should find many that find it appealing and cool, and what it gives up in practicality, it makes up for with tech that people want. Small crossovers are the new compact sedan of a generation that is just coming into its buying power, and Mitsubishi is ready with a product that opens the door to shoppers that are looking for something more stylish than their Outlander and RVR, and different than the CR-Vs and RAV4s that are in everyone’s driveways.

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VANCOUVER – Since its introduction, the five-seat Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) has gone from new kid to the world's best selling plug-in hybrid in very short order. It also sets the stage for 2020, when Mitsubishi wants 20 per cent of its sales to be either fully electric or plug-in hybrid vehicles. A tall order perhaps, but based upon the first drive of the Outlander PHEV, it is an attainable goal. It is offered in two basic trims — SE S-AWC and GT S-AWC, with an available Touring package on the former.

The Outlander PHEV's powertrain is comprised of a 2.0-litre gas engine, two electric motors and a generator. The gas engine develops 117 horsepower and 137 pound-feet of torque, and works with an electric motor that adds 80 horsepower and 101 lb.-ft. of torque. This combination drives the front wheels through a single-speed transmission. The second electric motor, pumping out 80 horsepower and 144-lb.-ft. of torque, drives the rear wheels through a single-speed box. This layout gives the Outlander all-weel-drive — Super All Wheel Control (S-AWC), as Mitsubishi calls it, that includes a lock mode for trying times. It proved to be a match for the mechanical system found in the regular Outlander, in spite of its obvious differences.

Now, Mitsubishi does not list a net system output, but it should around 200 horsepower and 250 lb.-ft. of torque. The result is a run from rest to 100 km/h in about 10.5 seconds, and a 682-kilogram tow capability.

Click here for exclusive local dealer pricing on the 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander
A 12 kWh lithium-ion battery, which sits in the central tunnel, supplies the electric side. From a full charge, it delivers 35 kilometres of electric-only driving — it, says Mitsubishi, beats the competition including the Volvo XC60 T8, which is rated at 27 kilometres. Using a 220-volt outlet, the Outlander takes 2.5 hours to fully recharge. The battery is also covered under Mitsubishi's generous 10-year, 160,000-kilometre powertrain warranty.

The driver can also monitor the Outlander PHEV's battery through a phone app. It shows state of charge, time to full charge, allows the cabin to be pre-conditioned, locates the Outlander by turning on the lights, and shows if any of the doors or the rear tailgate is ajar, among other things.

One of the keys to the manner in which the Outlander PHEV works is regenerative braking — with two electric motors harvesting otherwise waste energy it is proficient. The plus is found in steering wheel-mounded paddle shifters; they allow the driver to pick from six stages of regenerative braking. The base mode (B0) delivers very little "engine" braking, while level five (B5) amps it up to the point where the vehicle is slowed fairly quickly. That said, it is far from being a one pedal drive.

The system has three distinctly different drive modes. EV, which is the default mode, sees the Outlander PHEV cruise along using electrons alone. In Series mode the PHEV is driven electrically with the gas engine driving the generator to produce the electricity needed to support the battery. It comes into play when the battery nears depletion. Finally, Parallel mode sees the gas engine drive the Outlander PHEV with the electric motors chipping in when needed. Typically, it comes into play at speeds over 120 km/h, where it is more economical to use the gas engine than to generate electricity at these speeds. Likewise, if the driver gooses the gas pedal, it kicks in to bring shot of urgency to the acceleration.

What's impressive is the manner in which the powertrain switches between its different operating modes — it is seamless and better than many of its peers because the different components are "rev-matched" to ease the transition.

There are also three driver-selectable modes. EV Priority uses the electric side until the battery charge is low. Battery Charge mode is exactly that — it can put an 80 per cent charge into the battery in 40 minutes. The third is Battery Save, which allows the driver to conserve the battery for a city run where it is more effective.

Dynamically, the Outlander PHEV mirrors its regular sibling in the manner in which it drives, with one notable exception — it is remarkably quiet, regardless of speed. Running up the Sea To Sky Highway, it reassuringly handled the twisty parts. Body roll was minimal, and the feel and feedback afforded by the steering was fast and precise. Conversely, about town the suspension then soaked up gnarly pavement in stride.

Performance-wise, the Outlander was also quick to react to a prod at the gas pedal, even when climbing a fairly steep grade. The foregoing is remarkable, given the 250-kilograms in additional mass the PHEV is carrying when compared to the V6-powered Outlander. Despite the added mass, the average fuel economy returned – on a run where the powertrain was not babied – did come as a pleasant surprise. At 5.1 L/100 kilometres, it's frugal and then some. The upshot is there is very little to dislike.

As for compromises, there are remarkably few. The size of the gas tank shrinks — it measures 43-litres, compared to 60 in the regular, all-wheel-drive Outlander. In spite of the electric-only range, the PHEV enjoys it still shaves the combined driving range by over 100 km. The other difference is found in the trunk space — the PHEV's floor is higher, and so the capacity drops from 968 litres to 861. Interestingly, the seat-down capacity is larger than the V6-powered seven-seater, at 2,209 litres. Neither of these nits should be enough to make a potential buyer think twice.

 

 

 

The cabin is pretty much mirrors the regular Outlander, with two exceptions. The centre console is different — the gear lever picks the gears and a button engages park. The other difference is the instrumentation; it shows what the powertrain is doing and what's remaining in the battery and gas tank.

Base Outlander PHEVs, the SE S-AWC model, arrives with blind-spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert; moving up to the fully loaded GT S-AWC trim adds forward collision avoidance with automatic braking and pedestrian detection, adaptive cruise control, lane-departure warning, a multi-view camera and automatic high beams.
The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV, which is hitting dealers now, has a starting price of $42,998 for the SE S-AWC and tops out at $45,998 for the GT S-AWC. These prices are offset by provincial rebates — $2,500 in B.C., $4,000 in Quebec and $9,555 in Ontario.

2018 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross Test Drive and Review: A Sporty Crossover Newcomer

Things are happening at Mitsubishi. As the Japanese company celebrates its 115th anniversary as an auto manufacturer, Mitsubishi is also touting a new venture with Nissan and Renault that will affect its fortunes for years to come. The new Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi Alliance is poised to become the world's largest automaker group, with plans to develop new shared global platforms, technologies and manufacturing. Before that new marriage is fully consummated, a new baby has been hatched: the all-new 2018 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross, a compact crossover utility vehicle (CUV) that will be hitting U.S. showrooms in March 2018.

The Eclipse name was previously attached to one of Mitsubishi's vehicles through four generations from the 1990 to 2012 model years. The sport compact was a cute little coupe with a lively personality, and was the product of a previous manufacturing partnership that Mitsubishi had with Chrysler Corporation called "Diamond Star Motors."

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The Eclipse Cross shares the name and a few design touches from the legacy vehicle, but it is a completely different class of vehicle. In size and price, it is smack in the middle of Outlander Sport and Outlander. Mitsubishi perceived a gap in the market for a reasonably priced sporty CUV, and they believe that Eclipse Cross will fit right in with little direct competition.

Mitsubishi focused on Eclipse Cross's sporty appearance, and they did not ignore handling and performance to match. All but the front-wheel drive base ES model come with standard Super-All-Wheel Control (S-AWC), and the feature can be added to the base model for just $600. S-AWC is a torque-vectoring all-wheel drive system that directs power to the outside wheels in a corner, sharpening turning response and improving handling in all road conditions. With four-wheel independent suspension (front struts/rear multi-link) and stabilizer bars front and rear, the Eclipse Cross stays flat through turns, with minimal body roll. Thankfully, a generous 8.6 inches of minimum ground clearance is maintained, which will be appreciated in light off-road and snow conditions.

A new engine for U.S. vehicles, a turbocharged 1.5-liter inline four-cylinder that's tuned to produce 152 hp and 184 lb-ft of torque using direct gasoline injection, is the only engine choice for Eclipse Cross. It uses a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT) with eight stepped ratios. The engine is sprightly and eager to deliver its torque at low RPM. It can motivate the CUV off the line nicely and still has some power in reserve for freeway passing speed and hill climbs. Despite the "eight-speed" tuning of the CVT, though, it displays a bit of the rubber band effect that can plague the technology. Stuck in "Drive" and without the intervention of the driver through the paddle shifters, the transmission drones a bit and lags behind throttle input. You can counter this by "downshifting," but it makes some driving situations a little busier than they should be. Be sure to take the Eclipse Cross out on the highway during your test drive and see if this behavior is acceptable for your driving. 1.5-liter turbocharged gasoline direct injection engine.

Eclipse Cross can be loaded down with a ton of tech. Two unique features for vehicles in the class are a touchpad in the center console to access the infotainment system, and a full-color head-up display (HUD). The LED HUD projects vital information (speed, navigation prompts, etc.) on a small acrylic screen that flips up automatically when the vehicle is started, and folds flat when the ignition is turned off. Mazda uses a similar system on many of its vehicles, and it's a smart, simple solution. Dash buttons to the left of the steering wheel adjust the height of the image or fold the screen away for drivers who prefer not to use it. Best of all, the screen is brightly visible in the daytime, even when using polarized sunglasses.

Eclipse Cross will be the first Mitsubishi vehicle to be equipped with Mitsubishi Connect, a new communications system to allow owners to use an app on their smart phones to track their vehicles, set up geofencing, remote start and temperature control and other features. The subscription-based system uses an onboard 4G LTE cellular modem, and will come with a free trial period.
Mitsubishi's got a suite of advanced safety systems for its vehicles, and Eclipse Cross will be available with the latest versions. Blind Spot Warning (BSW) and Lane Change Assist (LCA), Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), Forward Collision Mitigation (FCM), Lane Departure Warning (LDW), Adaptive Cruise Control System (ACC), Multi-View Camera System and Automatic High Beam (AHB) are all available or standard on upper trim levels.

2018 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross on the road.
I drove the Eclipse Cross up the Pacific Coast Highway from Santa Monica to Calamigos Ranch in Malibu for the opportunity to experience the new vehicle in a variety of conditions, from stop-and-go traffic to twisty mountain roads to a brief freeway blast. The little turbo engine proved its worth, with plenty of power for inclines and speed runs, and a surprising lack of noise or thrashiness. Sometimes these small turbo engines sound like they're being tortured, but the new 1.5-liter lump is smooth and quiet. Handling and turn in are very good – sporty, even. The higher-than-sedan driving position will please SUV fans, and the view from the big windshield is the highlight of a package of all-around outward visibility.

There will be four trim levels of Eclipse Cross at launch: ES; LE; SE; and SEL. Each trim level gets the same 1.5-liter turbo and CVT. The base FWD ES starts at $23,295, but still comes with a nice array of standard features, including a color multi-information display screen, Bluetooth, rearview camera, cruise control, power door locks and windows and more. S-AWC adds $600 to the base ES. LE starts at $24,895 and adds the 7-inch thin display, Apple Car Play and Android Auto support and 18-inch alloy wheels. SE starts at $26,395 with the addition of Blind Spot Warning, Rear Cross Traffic Alert, Lane Change Alert, proximity key with push-button start, electronic parking brake, and Mitsubishi Connect with a free two-year trial. The top-of-the-line SEL (starting at $27,895) is loaded with the HUD, multi-view camera, leather seating surfaces, and LED headlights. A touring package can be added on top of that (starting at $30,395), including a 710-watt Rockford-Fosgate premium audio system, advanced safety technology, and a heated steering wheel and heated rear seats.

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Eclipse Cross dashboard.
Photo (c) Mitsubishi
Eclipse Cross cabin.

Mitsubishi's 5-year/60,000-mile basic warranty covers the Eclipse Cross, along with a 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain limited warranty, 7-year/100,000-mile anti-corrosion limited warranty and 5-year/unlimited mile roadside assistance package. EPA fuel economy estimates have not yet been announced.
Mitsubishi is positioning the 2018 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross as an affordable mainstream sporty compact SUV. It shares that space with Nissan's outgoing Juke and upcoming Kicks, the Mazda CX-5, Toyota C-HR, and Honda HR-V. Buyers will need to drive them all to find the similarities and differences, as there's some variety in size and performance characteristics.

The 2018 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross is a worthy product to launch the 116th year of Mitsubishi cars, and gives hope at the dawn of the Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi Alliance.

Eclipse Cross makes good use of crisp body lines and a swooping roofline to project an athletic profile, inspired by a sprinter in the "Set" position at the starting line. This impression is amplified by wheelbase that is slightly longer that the competition's (106.4 inches vs. 104.7 inches for 2018 Toyota RAV4) with short overall body length (175.5 inches vs 183.5 inches for 2018 Toyota RAV4). How do they do that? The designers kept the overhangs very brief in front and rear.

The Mitsubishi "Dynamic Shield" gives the front fascia its expressive look, with LED accent lighting and DRL (full LED headlights are available on upper trim levels). A signature LED taillight treatment lets you know the Eclipse Cross has left the building.

Photo (c) Mitsubishi
2018 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross profile.
Overall, the design is a good one, though it is not so distinctive that it will stand out from the crowd. Choose an Eclipse Cross in a new high-intensity premium metallic red paint and you'll be able to find your vehicle at the grocery store.

Inside, the Eclipse Cross is nicely designed, with high levels of fit and finish, good quality materials and a well-conceived layout. The second row and cargo area have received some smart engineering. In order to maximize utility, the 60/40-split seat not only folds down, it also slides forward and back about eight inches, making more room for luggage than the spec sheet indicates (22.63 cubic feet). The seat back reclines, and there's available second-row seat heat on the outboard positions and a sliding panoramic sunroof overhead.

The driver's seat is the place to be, with a cockpit feel. The manual tilt-and-telescope adjustable steering wheel is home to the usual buttons and controls. Big paddle shifters are mounted to the steering column behind the wheel. The seven-inch touchscreen telematics interface is mounted on the dash at the top of the center stack – the best location for safety and visibility.
Eclipse Cross is loaded with tech, but admirably uncluttered. I did miss having a dedicated audio volume knob in the center console. There is a volume control on the left side of the steering wheel, and a touch control on the passenger's side of the touchscreen at the top of the dash. More seat time might make this a moot point, but first impressions felt the absence.

Photo (c) Mitsubishi
Eclipse Cross wheel.
Mitsubishi focused on Eclipse Cross's sporty appearance, and they did not ignore handling and performance to match. All but the front-wheel drive base ES model come with standard Super-All-Wheel Control (S-AWC), and the feature can be added to the base model for just $600. S-AWC is a torque-vectoring all-wheel drive system that directs power to the outside wheels in a corner, sharpening turning response and improving handling in all road conditions. With four-wheel independent suspension (front struts/rear multi-link) and stabilizer bars front and rear, the Eclipse Cross stays flat through turns, with minimal body roll. Thankfully, a generous 8.6 inches of minimum ground clearance is maintained, which will be appreciated in light off-road and snow conditions.
A new engine for U.S. vehicles, a turbocharged 1.5-liter inline four-cylinder that's tuned to produce 152 hp and 184 lb-ft of torque using direct gasoline injection, is the only engine choice for Eclipse Cross. It uses a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT) with eight stepped ratios. The engine is sprightly and eager to deliver its torque at low RPM. It can motivate the CUV off the line nicely and still has some power in reserve for freeway passing speed and hill climbs. Despite the "eight-speed" tuning of the CVT, though, it displays a bit of the rubber band effect that can plague the technology. Stuck in "Drive" and without the intervention of the driver through the paddle shifters, the transmission drones a bit and lags behind throttle input. You can counter this by "downshifting," but it makes some driving situations a little busier than they should be. Be sure to take the Eclipse Cross out on the highway during your test drive and see if this behavior is acceptable for your driving.

Photo (c) Mitsubishi
1.5-liter turbocharged gasoline direct injection engine.
Eclipse Cross can be loaded down with a ton of tech. Two unique features for vehicles in the class are a touchpad in the center console to access the infotainment system, and a full-color head-up display (HUD). The LED HUD projects vital information (speed, navigation prompts, etc.) on a small acrylic screen that flips up automatically when the vehicle is started, and folds flat when the ignition is turned off. Mazda uses a similar system on many of its vehicles, and it's a smart, simple solution. Dash buttons to the left of the steering wheel adjust the height of the image or fold the screen away for drivers who prefer not to use it. Best of all, the screen is brightly visible in the daytime, even when using polarized sunglasses.

Eclipse Cross will be the first Mitsubishi vehicle to be equipped with Mitsubishi Connect, a new communications system to allow owners to use an app on their smart phones to track their vehicles, set up geofencing, remote start and temperature control and other features. The subscription-based system uses an onboard 4G LTE cellular modem, and will come with a free trial period.

Mitsubishi's got a suite of advanced safety systems for its vehicles, and Eclipse Cross will be available with the latest versions. Blind Spot Warning (BSW) and Lane Change Assist (LCA), Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), Forward Collision Mitigation (FCM), Lane Departure Warning (LDW), Adaptive Cruise Control System (ACC), Multi-View Camera System and Automatic High Beam (AHB) are all available or standard on upper trim levels.

2018 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross on the road.
I drove the Eclipse Cross up the Pacific Coast Highway from Santa Monica to Calamigos Ranch in Malibu for the opportunity to experience the new vehicle in a variety of conditions, from stop-and-go traffic to twisty mountain roads to a brief freeway blast. The little turbo engine proved its worth, with plenty of power for inclines and speed runs, and a surprising lack of noise or thrashiness. Sometimes these small turbo engines sound like they're being tortured, but the new 1.5-liter lump is smooth and quiet. Handling and turn in are very good – sporty, even. The higher-than-sedan driving position will please SUV fans, and the view from the big windshield is the highlight of a package of all-around outward visibility.

There will be four trim levels of Eclipse Cross at launch: ES; LE; SE; and SEL. Each trim level gets the same 1.5-liter turbo and CVT. The base FWD ES starts at $23,295, but still comes with a nice array of standard features, including a color multi-information display screen, Bluetooth, rearview camera, cruise control, power door locks and windows and more. S-AWC adds $600 to the base ES. LE starts at $24,895 and adds the 7-inch thin display, Apple Car Play and Android Auto support and 18-inch alloy wheels. SE starts at $26,395 with the addition of Blind Spot Warning, Rear Cross Traffic Alert, Lane Change Alert, proximity key with push-button start, electronic parking brake, and Mitsubishi Connect with a free two-year trial. The top-of-the-line SEL (starting at $27,895) is loaded with the HUD, multi-view camera, leather seating surfaces, and LED headlights. A touring package can be added on top of that (starting at $30,395), including a 710-watt Rockford-Fosgate premium audio system, advanced safety technology, and a heated steering wheel and heated rear seats.

Mitsubishi's 5-year/60,000-mile basic warranty covers the Eclipse Cross, along with a 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain limited warranty, 7-year/100,000-mile anti-corrosion limited warranty and 5-year/unlimited mile roadside assistance package. EPA fuel economy estimates have not yet been announced.
Mitsubishi is positioning the 2018 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross as an affordable mainstream sporty compact SUV. It shares that space with Nissan's outgoing Juke and upcoming Kicks, the Mazda CX-5, Toyota C-HR, and Honda HR-V. Buyers will need to drive them all to find the similarities and differences, as there's some variety in size and performance characteristics.

The 2018 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross is a worthy product to launch the 116th year of Mitsubishi cars, and gives hope at the dawn of the Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi Alliance.

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